08 10 / 2013

What is the best way to reach teenagers? Well, that’s simple, isn’t it? Grab some food, post some flyers, and the teenagers will appear. However, that isn’t the case, and some organizations are starting to recognize that. For example, the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition has been utilizing their UNITY Teen Writing Workshop to help teens express themselves through writing.

            Kate Merrigan, the UNITY Program Coordinator, explains that the medium of writing is a safe place to start. “They have to write all the time anyway…. It’s an easy entry point into art-making because this is something that you’re already doing.” The program has chosen to stay away from prompts, as the students sometimes feel limited by the choices provided.

It’s a sense of discovery that benefits the students as they are completing creative writing projects, like an “I Am Poem,” because the students are able to express themselves through a medium that is central to learning their own identity and is a safe format for sharing that identity as well.  As Kate explains, “There are other art forms that create that invitation—self-portraits create that invitation, theater creates that invitation, but I think it’s really clear for teens than an I Am From poem is a way to share your identity right now.”

“Teenagers crave that,” she explains. “We all do. Who doesn’t like talking about themselves?”

19 9 / 2013

A program description from George Mason University:

"Our mission is to advance the management of all aspects of the arts: commercial and not-for-profit; theatre, dance, music, visual, museum, literary, film, video and the combination of any and all of these in exciting arts centers around the country. Our graduates provide for the continuance, development and nurturing of the art form, the artist and the audience, using technology, science, best practices, relevant and vibrant communications and good practical reasoning, taught by some of this country’s most outstanding practicing arts managers."

"To Manage Not Administer–The Maun of Coordination and Alignment

First, the program is called the Master of Arts in Arts Management, rather than Arts Administration, the more common nomenclature. The word management derives from the Greek root maun, meaning “to coordinate” or “to bring into alignment.”
Our vision is to see arts managers bring into alignment the many resources required to birth, sustain, and further develop arts organizations. We also see management as occurring at a variety of levels:

  • those who would coordinate the people
  • engage the community
  • develop and sustain the audiences
  • influence the politics
  • foster the development
  • track the finances
  • plan artistic programming

We prepare candidates to support both internal and external alignment, in seamless fashion and at all levels of opportunity and engagement.”

19 9 / 2013

explore-blog:

In the wake of the new J. D. Salinger biography, Joyce Maynard, author of the poignant At Home in the World: A Memoir, steps forward to reveal an ominous side of the revered author, exploring its implications for our cultural mythology of genius and how it bespeaks “the quiet acceptance, apparently alive and well in our culture, of the notion that genius justifies cruel or abusive treatment of those who serve the artist and his art”:

I was 18 when he wrote to me in the irresistible voice of Holden Caulfield, though he was 53 at the time. Within months I left school to live with Salinger; gave up my scholarship; severed relationships with friends; disconnected from my family; forswore all books, music, food and ideas not condoned by him. At the time, I believed I’d be with Jerry Salinger forever.
His was a seduction played out with words and ideas, not lovemaking, but to the young girl reading those words — as with a few million other readers — there could have been no more powerful allure.
Salinger wasn’t simply brilliant, funny, wise; he burrowed into one’s brain, seeming to understand things nobody else ever had. His expressions of admiration (“I couldn’t have created a character I love more than you”) were intoxicating. His dismissal and contempt, when they came, were devastating.
I was 19 when he put two $50 bills in my hand and sent me away. Years after he dismissed me, his voice stayed in my head, offering opinions on everything he loved and all that he condemned. This was true even though, on his list of the condemned, was my own self.
[…]
I am now 59. Let a man tell me now that I am of no worth or value, and never will be and the man will be diminished in my eyes. But when a man who had become for me the possessor of all wisdom told me these things, when I was 18, the one diminished was myself.
[…]
There is art, and there are artists. Let’s not confuse the two.

Artwork by Eleni Kalorkoti

explore-blog:

In the wake of the new J. D. Salinger biography, Joyce Maynard, author of the poignant At Home in the World: A Memoir, steps forward to reveal an ominous side of the revered author, exploring its implications for our cultural mythology of genius and how it bespeaks “the quiet acceptance, apparently alive and well in our culture, of the notion that genius justifies cruel or abusive treatment of those who serve the artist and his art”:

I was 18 when he wrote to me in the irresistible voice of Holden Caulfield, though he was 53 at the time. Within months I left school to live with Salinger; gave up my scholarship; severed relationships with friends; disconnected from my family; forswore all books, music, food and ideas not condoned by him. At the time, I believed I’d be with Jerry Salinger forever.

His was a seduction played out with words and ideas, not lovemaking, but to the young girl reading those words — as with a few million other readers — there could have been no more powerful allure.

Salinger wasn’t simply brilliant, funny, wise; he burrowed into one’s brain, seeming to understand things nobody else ever had. His expressions of admiration (“I couldn’t have created a character I love more than you”) were intoxicating. His dismissal and contempt, when they came, were devastating.

I was 19 when he put two $50 bills in my hand and sent me away. Years after he dismissed me, his voice stayed in my head, offering opinions on everything he loved and all that he condemned. This was true even though, on his list of the condemned, was my own self.

[…]

I am now 59. Let a man tell me now that I am of no worth or value, and never will be and the man will be diminished in my eyes. But when a man who had become for me the possessor of all wisdom told me these things, when I was 18, the one diminished was myself.

[…]

There is art, and there are artists. Let’s not confuse the two.

Artwork by Eleni Kalorkoti

(Source: , via explore-blog)

19 9 / 2013

explore-blog:

Milton Glaser, the greatest graphic designer alive and creator of the iconic I♥NY logo, on art, technology, and the secret of life

Utilizing a tool like this would be beneficial for our digital storytelling because it catches the viewer’s eye. The picture could lead to a brief description below it, which leads to a short article or interview. Powerful, yet simple tool.

explore-blog:

Milton Glaser, the greatest graphic designer alive and creator of the iconic I♥NY logo, on art, technology, and the secret of life

Utilizing a tool like this would be beneficial for our digital storytelling because it catches the viewer’s eye. The picture could lead to a brief description below it, which leads to a short article or interview. Powerful, yet simple tool.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

17 9 / 2013

"Our intuition is shaped by context, and that context is deeply informed by the world we live in. It can thus serve as a blinder — or blind spot — of sorts. … With mindfulness, however, we can strive to find a balance between fact-checking our intuitions and remaining open-minded. We can then make our best judgments, with the information we have and no more, but with, as well, the understanding that time may change the shape and color of that information."

How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes – lessons in mindfulness and creativity from the great detective  (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

12 9 / 2013

explore-blog:

Jake Barton's stirring TED talk about building collective memory and his work on the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, lending whole new meaning to the notion that "a museum is an institution dedicated to making connections."

The story that begins at 8:01 is nothing short of remarkable.

Also see Barton on the role of museums and memorials in society and the power of collaborative storytelling

(Source: explore-blog)

12 9 / 2013

explore-blog:

Trailer for Hide & Eek, a clever picture-book that requires a flashlight for the illustrations to come alive – a bittersweet reminder of the romance of covetous lucubration under the covers, lost in the era of backlit tablets. 

(Source: , via explore-blog)

12 9 / 2013

explore-blog:

The inimitable Lisa Congdon (previously) hand-letters Tolstoy. Paradoxically, Tolstoy spent the last two decades of his life obsessively trying to know humanity’s greatest wisdom.
Pair with this rare recording of the author reading from his Calendar of Wisdom.

explore-blog:

The inimitable Lisa Congdon (previouslyhand-letters Tolstoy. Paradoxically, Tolstoy spent the last two decades of his life obsessively trying to know humanity’s greatest wisdom.

Pair with this rare recording of the author reading from his Calendar of Wisdom.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

12 9 / 2013

Sundance Institute.

Need I say more?

The Sundance Institute, widely known for its film festival, has a wonderful website. It contains so many different resources, including video clips for Meet the Artists, articles, programs, events, and so much else.

The website as a whole tells a great story into what the organization is, who they are, how they can serve artists and professionals, and what impacts they have made in the art community.

They don’t just share their own stories, but everyone else’s too. Definitely a place to go when you need inspiration.

12 9 / 2013

When looking for inspiration, I often lean towards venues I have attended and then see what resources and outlets they offer. 

Back in January, I attended a few performances at the HERE Arts Center in NYC. When I was looking at their website, I stumbled upon a project called MADE HERE.

MADE HERE is a documentary series, going on its fourth season, highlighting different performing artists in New York City. Each season has different topics which it highlights. Below is a description from their website:

MADE HERE is a documentary series devoted to the lives of performing artists based in New York City. In Season One, the series explored the issues of Creative Real EstateDay & Night JobsFamily BalanceActivism and Technology. In Season Two, MADE HERE explored IdentityCreative PracticeMoneyLifework, and Home. Season Three will focus on Art & CommerceCriticism, and Health. Season Four will explore Gender & Sexuality, Influence and the question of Staying or Going.

A huge resource for artists, this website has grown and has included over 87 artists so far.